any way the wind blows
thenewrepublic:

George Orwell’s Brilliant Guide to Writing Well
The best writing advice you’ll ever read. Period. 

thenewrepublic:

George Orwell’s Brilliant Guide to Writing Well

The best writing advice you’ll ever read. Period. 

misspelledlife:

SLAAAAY TORONTO IM SO PROUD OF THIS

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Villa Vals

Architects CMA and SeARCH were focusing on the question if it would be possible to conceal a house in an Alpine slope while still exploiting the wonderful views and allowing light to enter the building when planing the Villa Vals. They decided to build a central patio into the steep incline to create a large facade with considerable potential for window openings. The viewing angle from the building is slightly inclined, giving a dramatic view of the beautiful mountains on the opposite side of the narrow valley.

All images © Iwan Baan

Quinoa may deliver a complete protein—all of the amino acids you require—in a compact package, but rice and beans together actually do better. And like goji berries, blueberries and strawberries are packed with phytochemicals. The only problem is that lacking an exotic back story, food marketers can’t wring as exorbitant a markup from these staples: The domestic blueberry, for example, is periodically (and justifiably) marketed as a superfood, and in 2012, products featuring blueberries as a primary ingredient saw their sales nearly quadruple. But they only raked in $3.5 million—less than 2 percent of açaí-based product sales.

Tom Philpott, "Are Quinoa, Chia Seeds, and other ‘Superfoods’ a Scam?" (from Mother Jones)

Also worth highlighting is this section:

Worse than superfoods’ origin myths, though, are their effects on the people in their native regions. In 2009, at the height of the açaí berry hype, Bloomberg News reported that the fruit’s wholesale price had jumped 60-fold since the early 2000s, pricing the Amazonian villagers who rely on it out of the market. In the Andes, where quinoa has been cultivated since the time of the Incas, price spikes have turned a one-time staple into a luxury, and quinoa monocrops are crowding out the more sustainable traditional methods.” (emphasis mine)

So not only are the markets for “superfoods” putting the foods out of reach of the people who relied on them as a dietary staple, but there are foods easily accessible to us that deliver all the nutrition at a fraction of the cost, both to our grocery bill and to the social/environmental toll.

(via elenilote)

unamusedsloth:

Le Gogh

unamusedsloth:

Le Gogh

theeconomist:

Choose your parents wisely: There is a large class divide in how Americans raise their children. Rich parents can afford to ease up a bit; poor parents need help

Nothing is so strong as gentleness. Nothing is so gentle as real strength.
Frances de Sales (via kriztoferplitzkin)
Right-Wing Xenophobes Are Spreading Lies About Migrant Diseases. Again.

thenewrepublic:

In the 1830s, cholera was described as an “Irish disease.”

In the late 1800s tuberculosis was portrayed as a “Jewish disease.”

In 1900, San Franciscans quarantined Chinatown and threatened to burn it down.

In 2005, Lou Dobbs’s CNN show falsely reported that there had been 7,000 leprosy cases.

In 2006, Pat Buchanan claimed that that “clearly the illegal aliens” were to blame for the rise in bedbug infestations.

And now, a Republican is predicting a pandemic because of migrant kids.

We deserve better leaders.

ceinel:




This sculpture by Issac Cordal in Berlin is called “Politicians discussing global warming.”

ceinel:

This sculpture by Issac Cordal in Berlin is called “Politicians discussing global warming.”